F30POST
F30POST
2012-2015 BMW 3-Series and 4-Series Forum
BMW Garage BMW Meets Register Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read
BMW 3-Series and 4-Series Forum (F30 / F32) | F30POST > BIMMERPOST Universal Forums > General BMW News and Cars Discussion > Video: Latest Technologies Supporting Associates at BMW Plants
Post Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
      03-16-2017, 01:21 AM   #1
Jason
Administrator
Jason's Avatar
United_States
15331
Rep
18,289
Posts

Drives: F80 M3
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA

iTrader: (0)

Video: Latest Technologies Supporting Associates at BMW Plants

Check out the latest technologies that support associates at BMW plants.

__________________
Check on the Latest BMW News
Become a fan of Bimmerpost Facebook
Follow us on Bimmerpost Twitter
Subscribe to Bimmerpost Youtube Channel
Appreciate 3
      03-16-2017, 02:16 AM   #2
obert
Lieutenant Colonel
obert's Avatar
United_States
129
Rep
1,969
Posts

Drives: 2013 328i
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Seattle Wa

iTrader: (20)

Looks cool.
Appreciate 0
      03-16-2017, 09:34 AM   #3
M3 Adjuster
Major General
M3 Adjuster's Avatar
United_States
2283
Rep
8,089
Posts

Drives: 1M, X1 M Sport, E46 325ic
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Dallas, Tx

iTrader: (0)

I have visited the plant at Leipzig. Super cool how the line adjusts to accommodate the workers who program in their height on the line as they come in to work.

I've lived in Lafayette Indiana and had many friends that worked for Subaru Isuzu automotive and I can tell you that the japanese were not nearly as thoughtful about workers - at least not back in the 1980s and 90s.
__________________
Lone Star BMW CCA Chapter Ex-president (retired 2017) , Chief Driving Instructor - LIFETIME Member # 119366

Past: 1991 BMW E30 M3 street car ; 1988 BMW E30 M3 track car
Appreciate 2
      03-16-2017, 10:16 AM   #4
classyfast
Major
199
Rep
1,222
Posts

Drives: e36m/e46m/E92 LCI 335/f30 335
Join Date: Mar 2015
Location: CT

iTrader: (0)

Sounds good, but ergonomic aids like this only weaken muscles and teach folks to relay on support devices. What they should do for their workers is invest in nutrition and physical health programs for their folks, Americans are already typically overweight and less physical than generations before, this to me encourages that.

Now if you have a corrective ergonomic device which stops somebody with pressure points or physical alert parameters from doing something like lifting incorrectly, I'm all for it as a teaching device. That's about it.
Appreciate 0
      03-16-2017, 10:33 AM   #5
cncmastr
Major
cncmastr's Avatar
United_States
223
Rep
1,353
Posts

Drives: E30, E46 M3, E53, E39, F31
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Toms River, NJ

iTrader: (1)

Garage List
Send a message via AIM to cncmastr
Quote:
Originally Posted by classyfast View Post
Sounds good, but ergonomic aids like this only weaken muscles and teach folks to relay on support devices. What they should do for their workers is invest in nutrition and physical health programs for their folks, Americans are already typically overweight and less physical than generations before, this to me encourages that.

Now if you have a corrective ergonomic device which stops somebody with pressure points or physical alert parameters from doing something like lifting incorrectly, I'm all for it as a teaching device. That's about it.
You are right.
__________________
Appreciate 1
      03-16-2017, 10:54 AM   #6
Nomana
Captain
Nomana's Avatar
228
Rep
810
Posts

Drives: BMW
Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: SN

iTrader: (0)

What i see is opportunities for disable people.
Appreciate 2
      03-16-2017, 11:07 AM   #7
Invictus
Private First Class
36
Rep
152
Posts

Drives: Four wheels and a prayer.
Join Date: May 2016
Location: Canada

iTrader: (0)

Quote:
Originally Posted by Nomana View Post
What i see is opportunities for disable people.
This.
Appreciate 0
      03-16-2017, 11:52 AM   #8
LinkF1
Private First Class
United_States
97
Rep
166
Posts

Drives: MG M2
Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: Central Virginia

iTrader: (0)

Quote:
Originally Posted by classyfast View Post
Sounds good, but ergonomic aids like this only weaken muscles and teach folks to relay on support devices. What they should do for their workers is invest in nutrition and physical health programs for their folks, Americans are already typically overweight and less physical than generations before, this to me encourages that.

Now if you have a corrective ergonomic device which stops somebody with pressure points or physical alert parameters from doing something like lifting incorrectly, I'm all for it as a teaching device. That's about it.
You're wrong, these aids will significantly reduce worker injury rates, improve the quality of the product, and reduce cost.

While workforce wellness programs are a great investment, they are not often compulsory and therefore have limited effectiveness. The repetitive stress that employees get from these types of jobs is much different than what you would do as exercise. For example let us assume that the employee has to place each of those small plates in the task at 3:15 in the video. Assume the metal it is picking up is 225 grams (0.5 lb), picked up every 10 seconds. By using the robot BMW is removing 360 cycles and 81 kg (180 lbs) per hour from the worker's responsibilities. The robot also can place that part with a high degree of accuracy and work 24 hours a day if needed.

Note that the employee still has to lift the pre-processed and then the completed part, there are still highly repetitive tasks in this work environment. The robot likely replaced the task that the employees had the most trouble completing which is usually a source of quality defects.
      03-16-2017, 01:46 PM   #9
Destroya
First Lieutenant
Destroya's Avatar
179
Rep
313
Posts

Drives: 2016 X1, 2017 M2
Join Date: Dec 2015
Location: Oregon

iTrader: (0)

Quote:
Originally Posted by LinkF1 View Post
You're wrong, these aids will significantly reduce worker injury rates, improve the quality of the product, and reduce cost.

While workforce wellness programs are a great investment, they are not often compulsory and therefore have limited effectiveness. The repetitive stress that employees get from these types of jobs is much different than what you would do as exercise. For example let us assume that the employee has to place each of those small plates in the task at 3:15 in the video. Assume the metal it is picking up is 225 grams (0.5 lb), picked up every 10 seconds. By using the robot BMW is removing 360 cycles and 81 kg (180 lbs) per hour from the worker's responsibilities. The robot also can place that part with a high degree of accuracy and work 24 hours a day if needed.

Note that the employee still has to lift the pre-processed and then the completed part, there are still highly repetitive tasks in this work environment. The robot likely replaced the task that the employees had the most trouble completing which is usually a source of quality defects.
Yes. These devices, if programmed correctly can reduce repetitive type injuries but still maintain sufficient muscle strength for the worker. In fact, you could program the device to make the workers stronger, much like a weight training program.
Appreciate 0
      03-16-2017, 04:11 PM   #10
raysspl
Colonel
364
Rep
2,022
Posts

Drives: walking, bicycle, & bus
Join Date: Jan 2015
Location: eezitec.com

iTrader: (0)

Very cool stuff
__________________
Appreciate 0
      03-17-2017, 02:22 AM   #11
NV GUNS
First Lieutenant
NV GUNS's Avatar
United_States
21
Rep
306
Posts

Drives: '14 550ix M-sport with Mocca
Join Date: Jun 2016
Location: chicago

iTrader: (1)

Garage List
2002 330ci  [0.00]
2014 550ix M-sport  [0.00]
Quote:
Originally Posted by M3 Adjuster
I have visited the plant at Leipzig. Super cool how the line adjusts to accommodate the workers who program in their height on the line as they come in to work.

I've lived in Lafayette Indiana and had many friends that worked for Subaru Isuzu automotive and I can tell you that the japanese were not nearly as thoughtful about workers - at least not back in the 1980s and 90s.
obviously you have not seen gung ho from '86

Last edited by NV GUNS; 03-17-2017 at 12:20 PM.
Appreciate 1
      03-17-2017, 03:08 AM   #12
classyfast
Major
199
Rep
1,222
Posts

Drives: e36m/e46m/E92 LCI 335/f30 335
Join Date: Mar 2015
Location: CT

iTrader: (0)

Quote:
Originally Posted by LinkF1 View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by classyfast View Post
Sounds good, but ergonomic aids like this only weaken muscles and teach folks to relay on support devices. What they should do for their workers is invest in nutrition and physical health programs for their folks, Americans are already typically overweight and less physical than generations before, this to me encourages that.

Now if you have a corrective ergonomic device which stops somebody with pressure points or physical alert parameters from doing something like lifting incorrectly, I'm all for it as a teaching device. That's about it.
You're wrong, these aids will significantly reduce worker injury rates, improve the quality of the product, and reduce cost.

While workforce wellness programs are a great investment, they are not often compulsory and therefore have limited effectiveness. The repetitive stress that employees get from these types of jobs is much different than what you would do as exercise. For example let us assume that the employee has to place each of those small plates in the task at 3:15 in the video. Assume the metal it is picking up is 225 grams (0.5 lb), picked up every 10 seconds. By using the robot BMW is removing 360 cycles and 81 kg (180 lbs) per hour from the worker's responsibilities. The robot also can place that part with a high degree of accuracy and work 24 hours a day if needed.

Note that the employee still has to lift the pre-processed and then the completed part, there are still highly repetitive tasks in this work environment. The robot likely replaced the task that the employees had the most trouble completing which is usually a source of quality defects.
Some good points definitely, and 100% agree with QC improvement.....but let me expand on worker wellness programs from my view and from my particular industry, which is not automotive, but hear me out.

I'm a regional director of environmental health and safety for the 4th largest privately held company in this country. We employ about 15k warehouse workers whose primary function is to pick and lift 20-30,000lbs of product daily and their work is incentive based. Highly repetitive work. Good safety behaviors, good quality and good performance can make you 50-80k a year depending on what you do vs our engineered labor standards. That's 50-80k a year with a highschool diploma only.

We invest heavily in preventative stretching programs, self massage techniques, trigger point self applied therapy, heavy duty nutrition programs and we typically have stretching/gym space at all locations ran by what we call "motion coaches". Aside from the occasionally bad material handling equipment injuries, we had lots of ergonomic injuries over my last 9 years there. So we tried support belts, they don't work and they weaken your core/back/abs. We tried corrective ergo devices that don't allow you to lift without using your legs, the concept is great but they wear quickly and become ineffective after they're broken in. We've tried skeletal support devices to "ramp-up" folks that have been injured and they too don't work. These assistant devices, which support, supplement or add to workers abilities have one thing in common....they lessen the workers physical output. However you chose to look at that, you must acknowledge that this deconditions the human operating that apparatus.


What I've found is that for my industry the repetitive motion and the fact that folks stay in motion strengthens the muscles and keeps our folks active and relatively healthy. Our proactive health programs have by far been our best ROI. Now in my world , folks are paid to stretch pre-shift and typically paid time to have our "motion" coaches work with them so they have to participate. Easy as that. In 5 years we have saved over 50m in insurance, incurred medical and workmans comp claims dollars doing this. We are also 7x's safer than the industry average for occupational rate of injury in warehousing nation-wide so that works for us.

The guy that mentioned this can be used for disabled folks is spot on, that's probably the best application for stuff like this.
Appreciate 2
      03-17-2017, 05:46 AM   #13
LinkF1
Private First Class
United_States
97
Rep
166
Posts

Drives: MG M2
Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: Central Virginia

iTrader: (0)

Quote:
Originally Posted by classyfast View Post
Some good points definitely, and 100% agree with QC improvement.....but let me expand on worker wellness programs from my view and from my particular industry, which is not automotive, but hear me out.

I'm a regional director of environmental health and safety for the 4th largest privately held company in this country. We employ about 15k warehouse workers whose primary function is to pick and lift 20-30,000lbs of product daily and their work is incentive based. Highly repetitive work. Good safety behaviors, good quality and good performance can make you 50-80k a year depending on what you do vs our engineered labor standards. That's 50-80k a year with a highschool diploma only.
We are in similar industries, and in addition to having a masters with a focus on Human Factors and Ergonomics, I am currently responsible for the safety of roughly 400 workers. I can tell you that you will continue to have repetitive stress injuries without removing some of the load on your workers. Incentive based work such as what you describe tends to encourage employees to ignore their injuries until they significantly affect their output.

Quote:
We invest heavily in preventative stretching programs, self massage techniques, trigger point self applied therapy, heavy duty nutrition programs and we typically have stretching/gym space at all locations ran by what we call "motion coaches". Aside from the occasionally bad material handling equipment injuries, we had lots of ergonomic injuries over my last 9 years there. So we tried support belts, they don't work and they weaken your core/back/abs. We tried corrective ergo devices that don't allow you to lift without using your legs, the concept is great but they wear quickly and become ineffective after they're broken in. We've tried skeletal support devices to "ramp-up" folks that have been injured and they too don't work. These assistant devices, which support, supplement or add to workers abilities have one thing in common....they lessen the workers physical output. However you chose to look at that, you must acknowledge that this deconditions the human operating that apparatus.
None of that is good ergonomic practice. It is stuff that people who are not trained in Ergonomics think would help people lift. Stretching before exercise has been shown to increase injury rates, there needs to be light exercise beforehand to see positive results. There is no evidence in any literature that support belts help with lifting. Forcing someone to lift with their legs does not lead to fewer injuries, allowing them to lift with no limitations in technique does. Depending on the injury, orthopedic support devices can help recovery, but each situation is different. For most injuries the right answer is strength training with the affected muscle group, it will have the quickest results and the lowest resulting pain.

Quote:
What I've found is that for my industry the repetitive motion and the fact that folks stay in motion strengthens the muscles and keeps our folks active and relatively healthy. Our proactive health programs have by far been our best ROI. Now in my world , folks are paid to stretch pre-shift and typically paid time to have our "motion" coaches work with them so they have to participate. Easy as that. In 5 years we have saved over 50m in insurance, incurred medical and workmans comp claims dollars doing this. We are also 7x's safer than the industry average for occupational rate of injury in warehousing nation-wide so that works for us.

The guy that mentioned this can be used for disabled folks is spot on, that's probably the best application for stuff like this.
You have had great results, I don't want to take any focus away from that. I would recommend that you get a Board Certified Professional Ergonomist in to look at what you can do to further improve your workplace. With a good one you will see increased productivity from your workforce with a side effect of less injuries to have to deal with.
Appreciate 1
      03-18-2017, 05:29 PM   #14
classyfast
Major
199
Rep
1,222
Posts

Drives: e36m/e46m/E92 LCI 335/f30 335
Join Date: Mar 2015
Location: CT

iTrader: (0)

Quote:
Originally Posted by LinkF1 View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by classyfast View Post
Some good points definitely, and 100% agree with QC improvement.....but let me expand on worker wellness programs from my view and from my particular industry, which is not automotive, but hear me out.

I'm a regional director of environmental health and safety for the 4th largest privately held company in this country. We employ about 15k warehouse workers whose primary function is to pick and lift 20-30,000lbs of product daily and their work is incentive based. Highly repetitive work. Good safety behaviors, good quality and good performance can make you 50-80k a year depending on what you do vs our engineered labor standards. That's 50-80k a year with a highschool diploma only.
We are in similar industries, and in addition to having a masters with a focus on Human Factors and Ergonomics, I am currently responsible for the safety of roughly 400 workers. I can tell you that you will continue to have repetitive stress injuries without removing some of the load on your workers. Incentive based work such as what you describe tends to encourage employees to ignore their injuries until they significantly affect their output.

Quote:
We invest heavily in preventative stretching programs, self massage techniques, trigger point self applied therapy, heavy duty nutrition programs and we typically have stretching/gym space at all locations ran by what we call "motion coaches". Aside from the occasionally bad material handling equipment injuries, we had lots of ergonomic injuries over my last 9 years there. So we tried support belts, they don't work and they weaken your core/back/abs. We tried corrective ergo devices that don't allow you to lift without using your legs, the concept is great but they wear quickly and become ineffective after they're broken in. We've tried skeletal support devices to "ramp-up" folks that have been injured and they too don't work. These assistant devices, which support, supplement or add to workers abilities have one thing in common....they lessen the workers physical output. However you chose to look at that, you must acknowledge that this deconditions the human operating that apparatus.
None of that is good ergonomic practice. It is stuff that people who are not trained in Ergonomics think would help people lift. Stretching before exercise has been shown to increase injury rates, there needs to be light exercise beforehand to see positive results. There is no evidence in any literature that support belts help with lifting. Forcing someone to lift with their legs does not lead to fewer injuries, allowing them to lift with no limitations in technique does. Depending on the injury, orthopedic support devices can help recovery, but each situation is different. For most injuries the right answer is strength training with the affected muscle group, it will have the quickest results and the lowest resulting pain.

Quote:
What I've found is that for my industry the repetitive motion and the fact that folks stay in motion strengthens the muscles and keeps our folks active and relatively healthy. Our proactive health programs have by far been our best ROI. Now in my world , folks are paid to stretch pre-shift and typically paid time to have our "motion" coaches work with them so they have to participate. Easy as that. In 5 years we have saved over 50m in insurance, incurred medical and workmans comp claims dollars doing this. We are also 7x's safer than the industry average for occupational rate of injury in warehousing nation-wide so that works for us.

The guy that mentioned this can be used for disabled folks is spot on, that's probably the best application for stuff like this.
You have had great results, I don't want to take any focus away from that. I would recommend that you get a Board Certified Professional Ergonomist in to look at what you can do to further improve your workplace. With a good one you will see increased productivity from your workforce with a side effect of less injuries to have to deal with.
I really want to pick your brain as my degrees are more towards environmental compliance side than the physical ergo! I like what you're saying and literally will use your points to knock my industrial fitness specialist or "motion coach" down a few notches. They swear dynamic stretching and compound movements is what will make the difference. My argument for a couple years has been to allow a pre-shift workout time in our gyms (but all facilities don't have gyms like we do up here).

I want to know what you meant by allowing somebody to lift without physical limitations- I believe you said-- let me know.

Wish you were closer to New England, may have had a career for you!! (If you were looking!)

Feel free to PM me to shoot the shit.
Appreciate 0
      03-19-2017, 02:56 PM   #15
Frosty
Lieutenant Colonel
Frosty's Avatar
41
Rep
1,974
Posts

Drives: Ordered my E92 (7/10/06)
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Northern NJ

iTrader: (0)

Quote:
Originally Posted by classyfast View Post
Sounds good, but ergonomic aids like this only weaken muscles and teach folks to relay on support devices. What they should do for their workers is invest in nutrition and physical health programs for their folks, Americans are already typically overweight and less physical than generations before, this to me encourages that.

Now if you have a corrective ergonomic device which stops somebody with pressure points or physical alert parameters from doing something like lifting incorrectly, I'm all for it as a teaching device. That's about it.
..I cant help but think this is a means to data track movements placed where there is still human interaction within production for ultimate replacement by automation... hard to believe this a means to find ways to add the human element to the production...
__________________
.................................................. ....................
335i Coupe (6MT) (2007: 9/06 build, pre ordered, only owner): Space Grey / Black Leatherette / Grey Poplar trim / ZCW / ZSP / BMW assist w/ bluetooth / power rear shade / navi with iDrive / comfort access keyless entry /+homelink mirror/ 206,000+miles SOLD (AUG 2016)
.................................................. ......................
Appreciate 1
      03-20-2017, 01:43 PM   #16
Zirenz2006
Brigadier General
Zirenz2006's Avatar
United_States
248
Rep
3,685
Posts

Drives: '12 F30 328i Sport Line
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: US - NE

iTrader: (0)

Quote:
Originally Posted by NV GUNS View Post
obviously you have not seen gung ho from '86
Gung Ho reference.....Love it!

Haven't seen that in ages.
Appreciate 0
      03-20-2017, 02:33 PM   #17
NV GUNS
First Lieutenant
NV GUNS's Avatar
United_States
21
Rep
306
Posts

Drives: '14 550ix M-sport with Mocca
Join Date: Jun 2016
Location: chicago

iTrader: (1)

Garage List
2002 330ci  [0.00]
2014 550ix M-sport  [0.00]
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zirenz2006
Quote:
Originally Posted by NV GUNS View Post
obviously you have not seen gung ho from '86
Gung Ho reference.....Love it!

Haven't seen that in ages.
Gung Ho and Mr. Mom 2 keaton classics.
Appreciate 0
Post Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 03:41 PM.




f30post
f30post
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.7.0
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
1Addicts.com, BIMMERPOST.com, E90Post.com, F30Post.com, M3Post.com, ZPost.com, 5Post.com, 6Post.com, 7Post.com, XBimmers.com logo and trademark are properties of BIMMERPOST