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      07-29-2012, 05:45 AM   #1
txnewbie
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Best Sport Seat Position?

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I was wondering what advice there is out there for finding the best driving position with the sport seats. I keep fiddling with it but have no idea what principles should guide, e.g. straight arms, steering wheel close far away, higher lower, position of lumbar. I completely realize this is subjective, but I would love to hear people's preferences to try them out because I am just haphazardly moving stuff around without feeling quite sure what I am trying to get, besides the obvious of comfort. Thanks! (coming from horribly crappy seats where lower back went out not sure what to do with nice seats!)
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      07-29-2012, 06:01 AM   #2
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I come from a little Toyota MR2 roadster which had fairly comfy seats. In an attempt to replicate them I have the seat angle fully rocked back as the starting point. Seat height is about halfway on the adjustment, then adjust angle of the seatback and finally adjust pedal distance to suit.

After getting comfortable it gives quite a 'bucket seat' feel with your bum nice and low - well supported - and then the inflatable side supports adjusted to grip just enough but not uncomfortably.

Steering wheel preference is your choice, but I like it as low and close as possible. The only problem is that the top of the wheel obscures the top of the speedo if it's down as low as it will go - which annoys me.

Anyway - it is preference as you say but give this flavour a go and see if it makes you happy. You won't go anywhere through the corners
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      07-29-2012, 06:58 AM   #3
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At the dealership with a buddy and he felt the sports seats were too tight even with the bolsters deflated. I thought they were fine. I'm 6 foot 200lbs, he's about 6'1 and probably 210 tops.

Anybody else experience this?
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      07-29-2012, 08:38 AM   #4
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Let’s look at how to adjust the seat and steering wheel to provide you with the proper set-up for both street and track driving conditions. We will start with the seating position since that is our first contact with the car and every other adjustment is predicated on the correct seat set-up. Adjust the seat to the lowest position that still allows you a good view of the road ahead. This not only helps to lower the car’s center of gravity for better cornering and performance, but it also places the driver’s body closer to the vehicle’s yaw, pitch and roll axis. This gives the driver a better feel for what the car is doing during any changes in speed or direction. Your derrière should be tucked firmly into the seat back, so that you can get feedback from the chassis, through the seat, up your spine and finally reaching the brain (where you can determine what the car is doing). You will get a better feel as to what the rear end of the car is doing if your body is firmly anchored to the seat. Position the seat forward enough so your knee still has some bend in it with the clutch pedal being fully depressed. You do not want to be able to fully extend your leg or have to stretch while depressing the clutch. That will not provide you with adequate leverage while engaging the clutch or brake pedals. Also, you do not want the steering column interfering with the movement of your legs while you are operating the brake or clutch. Your right foot should be comfortably placed to allow you to pivot the foot from the accelerator to the brake pedal without lifting the heel off the floor. The left foot, when not operating the clutch, should be resting on the “dead pedal” (that’s what it is there for). This will provide you some additional bracing while cornering or during an emergency maneuver.Now that we have your feet and legs positioned correctly, let’s take a look at the arm position. The correct distance from the steering wheel is easily adjusted with some simple techniques. The proper distance can be achieved with your shoulders resting against the back of the seat, and then stretching your arms out straight (with no break in the elbows) so that the wrists are resting on the very top of the steering wheel. The wrists should be able to break so that your hands are able to droop over the far side of the wheel. If your wrists do not break at the top of the wheel, then you will need to adjust the seat (or adjust the angle of the seat-back) forward or backward to achieve this position. If your steering wheel has adjustability for reach (in and out) and height (up and down), this will give you some additional help in fine tuning your optimal position. You will probably notice that the angle of your seat-back (when adjusted correctly) will be more upright than you are accustomed to. Being too close or too far away from the wheel will inhibit your ability to maneuver in tight corners; i.e., driving on mountain roads, swerving to avoid an animal that might run into the street or driving on a race track. An improper position may even require you to move your hands on the steering wheel while cornering, which is not only a terrible technique but can also be dangerous.
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      07-29-2012, 08:56 AM   #5
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Great post! Thanks!

Quote:
Originally Posted by emtrey View Post
Let’s look at how to adjust the seat and steering wheel to provide you with the proper set-up for both street and track driving conditions. We will start with the seating position since that is our first contact with the car and every other adjustment is predicated on the correct seat set-up. Adjust the seat to the lowest position that still allows you a good view of the road ahead. This not only helps to lower the car’s center of gravity for better cornering and performance, but it also places the driver’s body closer to the vehicle’s yaw, pitch and roll axis. This gives the driver a better feel for what the car is doing during any changes in speed or direction. Your derrière should be tucked firmly into the seat back, so that you can get feedback from the chassis, through the seat, up your spine and finally reaching the brain (where you can determine what the car is doing). You will get a better feel as to what the rear end of the car is doing if your body is firmly anchored to the seat. Position the seat forward enough so your knee still has some bend in it with the clutch pedal being fully depressed. You do not want to be able to fully extend your leg or have to stretch while depressing the clutch. That will not provide you with adequate leverage while engaging the clutch or brake pedals. Also, you do not want the steering column interfering with the movement of your legs while you are operating the brake or clutch. Your right foot should be comfortably placed to allow you to pivot the foot from the accelerator to the brake pedal without lifting the heel off the floor. The left foot, when not operating the clutch, should be resting on the “dead pedal” (that’s what it is there for). This will provide you some additional bracing while cornering or during an emergency maneuver.Now that we have your feet and legs positioned correctly, let’s take a look at the arm position. The correct distance from the steering wheel is easily adjusted with some simple techniques. The proper distance can be achieved with your shoulders resting against the back of the seat, and then stretching your arms out straight (with no break in the elbows) so that the wrists are resting on the very top of the steering wheel. The wrists should be able to break so that your hands are able to droop over the far side of the wheel. If your wrists do not break at the top of the wheel, then you will need to adjust the seat (or adjust the angle of the seat-back) forward or backward to achieve this position. If your steering wheel has adjustability for reach (in and out) and height (up and down), this will give you some additional help in fine tuning your optimal position. You will probably notice that the angle of your seat-back (when adjusted correctly) will be more upright than you are accustomed to. Being too close or too far away from the wheel will inhibit your ability to maneuver in tight corners; i.e., driving on mountain roads, swerving to avoid an animal that might run into the street or driving on a race track. An improper position may even require you to move your hands on the steering wheel while cornering, which is not only a terrible technique but can also be dangerous.
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      07-29-2012, 08:59 AM   #6
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The drivers at the Performance Driving Center said that the height should be so that when four fingers are stacked on top of your head, it should touch the ceiling just barely. Also, the seat should be positioned so that the brake pedal can be depressed fully without the leg being locked.
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      07-29-2012, 08:59 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ron Scott
At the dealership with a buddy and he felt the sports seats were too tight even with the bolsters deflated. I thought they were fine. I'm 6 foot 200lbs, he's about 6'1 and probably 210 tops.

Anybody else experience this?
I had this experience after I ordered a euro delivery car and I sat in a random one at the dealer lot. I was so nervous and confused why I hadn't noticed this before. The only thing I can say is that this car was one of the three that the dealership got at the launch, and my car wasn't as tight. Was the car your buddy sat in a launch car?
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      07-29-2012, 09:05 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by emtrey View Post
Let’s look at how to adjust the seat and steering wheel to provide you with the proper set-up for both street and track driving conditions. We will start with the seating position since that is our first contact with the car and every other adjustment is predicated on the correct seat set-up. Adjust the seat to the lowest position that still allows you a good view of the road ahead. This not only helps to lower the car’s center of gravity for better cornering and performance, but it also places the driver’s body closer to the vehicle’s yaw, pitch and roll axis. This gives the driver a better feel for what the car is doing during any changes in speed or direction. Your derrière should be tucked firmly into the seat back, so that you can get feedback from the chassis, through the seat, up your spine and finally reaching the brain (where you can determine what the car is doing). You will get a better feel as to what the rear end of the car is doing if your body is firmly anchored to the seat. Position the seat forward enough so your knee still has some bend in it with the clutch pedal being fully depressed. You do not want to be able to fully extend your leg or have to stretch while depressing the clutch. That will not provide you with adequate leverage while engaging the clutch or brake pedals. Also, you do not want the steering column interfering with the movement of your legs while you are operating the brake or clutch. Your right foot should be comfortably placed to allow you to pivot the foot from the accelerator to the brake pedal without lifting the heel off the floor. The left foot, when not operating the clutch, should be resting on the “dead pedal” (that’s what it is there for). This will provide you some additional bracing while cornering or during an emergency maneuver.Now that we have your feet and legs positioned correctly, let’s take a look at the arm position. The correct distance from the steering wheel is easily adjusted with some simple techniques. The proper distance can be achieved with your shoulders resting against the back of the seat, and then stretching your arms out straight (with no break in the elbows) so that the wrists are resting on the very top of the steering wheel. The wrists should be able to break so that your hands are able to droop over the far side of the wheel. If your wrists do not break at the top of the wheel, then you will need to adjust the seat (or adjust the angle of the seat-back) forward or backward to achieve this position. If your steering wheel has adjustability for reach (in and out) and height (up and down), this will give you some additional help in fine tuning your optimal position. You will probably notice that the angle of your seat-back (when adjusted correctly) will be more upright than you are accustomed to. Being too close or too far away from the wheel will inhibit your ability to maneuver in tight corners; i.e., driving on mountain roads, swerving to avoid an animal that might run into the street or driving on a race track. An improper position may even require you to move your hands on the steering wheel while cornering, which is not only a terrible technique but can also be dangerous.


WOW... thanks for the details. I have automatic but the principles still seem to apply. I was a little unsure about what you were saying about not moving your hands when turning. I assume you mean on winding country roads and not city 90 degree turns. I am gonna go play with the seat right now. I just got my car on Friday. LOVING IT.... try to find any excuse to drive right now.
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      07-29-2012, 09:33 AM   #9
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Did a Porsche Driving Event last weekend. First thing the instructor advised was to SIT in an aggressive position for sporty driving. Drop the gagsta seat settings..you know- the ones that look like the driver is in a bathtub playing with his rubber duckie while holding the steering wheel in the other hand.
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      07-29-2012, 11:43 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ron Scott View Post
At the dealership with a buddy and he felt the sports seats were too tight even with the bolsters deflated. I thought they were fine. I'm 6 foot 200lbs, he's about 6'1 and probably 210 tops.

Anybody else experience this?
For me, it is a very good thing the side bolsters are adjustable. I guess I have a wide rib cage, because I just fit in the sport-line that I test drove.

I have a friend with a GTI. I really like that car, but the side bolsters in it jab into my rib cage, and it gets rather uncomfortable after a while. Based on his car, I didn't bother to go test drive one.

I did not realize that those bolsters inflated/deflated. Based on the owners manual, I was under the impression that they moved in and out. Does that mean that there is a mini air compressor built in there somewhere?
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      07-29-2012, 12:00 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by emtrey View Post
Did a Porsche Driving Event last weekend. First thing the instructor advised was to SIT in an aggressive position for sporty driving. Drop the gagsta seat settings..you know- the ones that look like the driver is in a bathtub playing with his rubber duckie while holding the steering wheel in the other hand.
Love the description...

Brother in law reported the same, after spending a weekend on the track with Porsche. Many drive far too low and way back from the steering wheel and think it is a 'sporty' seating position.

At least the sport seats have enough adjustments to get it right for most drivers.

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      07-29-2012, 12:35 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SCBimmerKid View Post
The drivers at the Performance Driving Center said that the height should be so that when four fingers are stacked on top of your head, it should touch the ceiling just barely. Also, the seat should be positioned so that the brake pedal can be depressed fully without the leg being locked.
If you did this in Dallas, you'd occasionally bounce your head on the ceiling. I'd suggest a bit more room if you live in an area with concrete roads and clay soil.
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      07-29-2012, 12:39 PM   #13
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Brother in law reported the same, after spending a weekend on the track with Porsche. Many drive far too low and way back from the steering wheel and think it is a 'sporty' seating position.


During the event , we drove Panamera GTS, Carrera and Carrera S. All had PDK. My car is 6 spd manual so I adjust for proper clutch engagement first, then tweaks the other settings.

Following the instructor's direction with the 3 "new" PDK cars and some spirited laps, I went home and re-adjusted my seating on the "old" ( 06 C2S) beater.

PS.. I would not buy PDK on a 911 because the gearbox/clutch is a delight but PDK is incredible. The instructors (all pros) said they are 3-4 seconds a lap faster with PDK...that is a ton on the track. Still can't figure out how it knew coming into hard braking at 100 mph and turning hard left at 50 mph, it needed a 3 gear downshift.......blew me away.
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      07-29-2012, 03:56 PM   #14
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      07-30-2012, 01:02 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by emtrey View Post
Did a Porsche Driving Event last weekend. First thing the instructor advised was to SIT in an aggressive position for sporty driving. Drop the gagsta seat settings..you know- the ones that look like the driver is in a bathtub playing with his rubber duckie while holding the steering wheel in the other hand.
LOL....can't I have gangsta settings for normal cruising though?
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      10-28-2014, 09:54 PM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by emtrey View Post
Adjust the seat to the lowest position that still allows you a good view of the road ahead. This not only helps to lower the car’s center of gravity for better cornering and performance, but it also places the driver’s body closer to the vehicle’s yaw, pitch and roll axis.
Quote:
Originally Posted by SCBimmerKid View Post
The drivers at the Performance Driving Center said that the height should be so that when four fingers are stacked on top of your head, it should touch the ceiling just barely.
These two rules seem to conflict, at least for me.
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      10-28-2014, 10:47 PM   #17
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Angry i hate seeing people sleeping while driving their lazy chair

Quote:
Originally Posted by emtrey View Post
Let’s look at how to adjust the seat and steering wheel to provide you with the proper set-up for both street and track driving conditions. We will start with the seating position since that is our first contact with the car and every other adjustment is predicated on the correct seat set-up. Adjust the seat to the lowest position that still allows you a good view of the road ahead. This not only helps to lower the car’s center of gravity for better cornering and performance, but it also places the driver’s body closer to the vehicle’s yaw, pitch and roll axis. This gives the driver a better feel for what the car is doing during any changes in speed or direction. Your derrière should be tucked firmly into the seat back, so that you can get feedback from the chassis, through the seat, up your spine and finally reaching the brain (where you can determine what the car is doing). You will get a better feel as to what the rear end of the car is doing if your body is firmly anchored to the seat. Position the seat forward enough so your knee still has some bend in it with the clutch pedal being fully depressed. You do not want to be able to fully extend your leg or have to stretch while depressing the clutch. That will not provide you with adequate leverage while engaging the clutch or brake pedals. Also, you do not want the steering column interfering with the movement of your legs while you are operating the brake or clutch. Your right foot should be comfortably placed to allow you to pivot the foot from the accelerator to the brake pedal without lifting the heel off the floor. The left foot, when not operating the clutch, should be resting on the “dead pedal” (that’s what it is there for). This will provide you some additional bracing while cornering or during an emergency maneuver.Now that we have your feet and legs positioned correctly, let’s take a look at the arm position. The correct distance from the steering wheel is easily adjusted with some simple techniques. The proper distance can be achieved with your shoulders resting against the back of the seat, and then stretching your arms out straight (with no break in the elbows) so that the wrists are resting on the very top of the steering wheel. The wrists should be able to break so that your hands are able to droop over the far side of the wheel. If your wrists do not break at the top of the wheel, then you will need to adjust the seat (or adjust the angle of the seat-back) forward or backward to achieve this position. If your steering wheel has adjustability for reach (in and out) and height (up and down), this will give you some additional help in fine tuning your optimal position. You will probably notice that the angle of your seat-back (when adjusted correctly) will be more upright than you are accustomed to. Being too close or too far away from the wheel will inhibit your ability to maneuver in tight corners; i.e., driving on mountain roads, swerving to avoid an animal that might run into the street or driving on a race track. An improper position may even require you to move your hands on the steering wheel while cornering, which is not only a terrible technique but can also be dangerous.
You stole the words right out of my mouth!!!

Driving a 6MT myself,the first thing i set is for my pedals:
Actually: No
I set my seat to be at the lowest point.
Then, if the seat allows, i set the front of my seat to be at the highest.
Why? Bucket seat sitting style!
Why? Because for safety... if, god forbid, i get into a frontal collision,the bottom of mushy seat would help keep me from sliding forward! Thats why.
Then once the bottom of my seat is set, i slide the seat forward just enough so that the
Clutch fully depress with my left leg still bend just a bit.
Before i set the back rest of the seat, you want to adjust the steering to be as far away from you, your chest , and your head as possible... to allow room for the airbag to deploy.
Then once the steering is set,you can finally set the back rest as upright as possible but ensuring that your wrists. Are resting on top of the steering, with your arms extended forward...

Set your mirrors for the blinds spots... and voila.


Quote:
Originally Posted by East River Guide View Post
These two rules seem to conflict, at least for me.
At first it might seem to contradict, but ultimately, you should looke at them as being sequential requirements...
First you adjust to be at the lowest possible possible for CG.
if that is too low, tben you just go up enough for you to confortably see 100 yards away. And PERIOD.
you do not need to go up any higher.
YOU DO NOT AND I REPEAT YOU DO NOT ADJUST YOUR SEAT TO SEE 3 INCH IN FRONT OF YOUR OWN VEHICLE!!!
Why would anyone want to do so???
I see so so so many people , especially ladies, seating so high up in order that they mighy be able to see the brand of their own car.... why? !!??? There are other ways to take reference of your car size when parking...
Anyways... i disgress

The point is, leave as much head room as possible.... simple as that.

Last edited by DrivenByE30; 10-28-2014 at 10:56 PM.
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      10-29-2014, 12:10 AM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by emtrey View Post
Let’s look at how to adjust the seat and steering wheel to provide you with the proper set-up for both street and track driving conditions. We will start with the seating position since that is our first contact with the car and every other adjustment is predicated on the correct seat set-up. Adjust the seat to the lowest position that still allows you a good view of the road ahead. This not only helps to lower the car’s center of gravity for better cornering and performance, but it also places the driver’s body closer to the vehicle’s yaw, pitch and roll axis. This gives the driver a better feel for what the car is doing during any changes in speed or direction. Your derrière should be tucked firmly into the seat back, so that you can get feedback from the chassis, through the seat, up your spine and finally reaching the brain (where you can determine what the car is doing). You will get a better feel as to what the rear end of the car is doing if your body is firmly anchored to the seat. Position the seat forward enough so your knee still has some bend in it with the clutch pedal being fully depressed. You do not want to be able to fully extend your leg or have to stretch while depressing the clutch. That will not provide you with adequate leverage while engaging the clutch or brake pedals. Also, you do not want the steering column interfering with the movement of your legs while you are operating the brake or clutch. Your right foot should be comfortably placed to allow you to pivot the foot from the accelerator to the brake pedal without lifting the heel off the floor. The left foot, when not operating the clutch, should be resting on the “dead pedal” (that’s what it is there for). This will provide you some additional bracing while cornering or during an emergency maneuver.Now that we have your feet and legs positioned correctly, let’s take a look at the arm position. The correct distance from the steering wheel is easily adjusted with some simple techniques. The proper distance can be achieved with your shoulders resting against the back of the seat, and then stretching your arms out straight (with no break in the elbows) so that the wrists are resting on the very top of the steering wheel. The wrists should be able to break so that your hands are able to droop over the far side of the wheel. If your wrists do not break at the top of the wheel, then you will need to adjust the seat (or adjust the angle of the seat-back) forward or backward to achieve this position. If your steering wheel has adjustability for reach (in and out) and height (up and down), this will give you some additional help in fine tuning your optimal position. You will probably notice that the angle of your seat-back (when adjusted correctly) will be more upright than you are accustomed to. Being too close or too far away from the wheel will inhibit your ability to maneuver in tight corners; i.e., driving on mountain roads, swerving to avoid an animal that might run into the street or driving on a race track. An improper position may even require you to move your hands on the steering wheel while cornering, which is not only a terrible technique but can also be dangerous.
Most of this.


Quote:
Originally Posted by SCBimmerKid View Post
The drivers at the Performance Driving Center said that the height should be so that when four fingers are stacked on top of your head, it should touch the ceiling just barely. Also, the seat should be positioned so that the brake pedal can be depressed fully without the leg being locked.
Seat height setting should be this.


Quote:
Originally Posted by East River Guide View Post
These two rules seem to conflict, at least for me.
They do and the second one is correct.
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      10-29-2014, 07:08 AM   #19
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Originally Posted by txnewbie View Post


WOW... thanks for the details. I have automatic but the principles still seem to apply. I was a little unsure about what you were saying about not moving your hands when turning. I assume you mean on winding country roads and not city 90 degree turns. I am gonna go play with the seat right now. I just got my car on Friday. LOVING IT.... try to find any excuse to drive right now.
With your hands at 9-3 you should be able to cross your arms when turning the wheel. You don't wanted to be so far away where you have to shuffle your hands when making that same turn.
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      10-29-2014, 07:30 AM   #20
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Be 6'7" and try to adhere to any seat positioning guides :/

4 fingers clearance above my head?! riiiiight
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      10-29-2014, 08:46 AM   #21
DrivenByE30
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Originally Posted by Alan_NJ View Post
Be 6'7" and try to adhere to any seat positioning guides :/

4 fingers clearance above my head?! riiiiight
Ah.. stop complaining....the rest of us wants tobe as tall as you...



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      10-29-2014, 09:04 AM   #22
Alan_NJ
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Hey Im not complaining.
Im happy that I can even fit at all and drive comfortably.
Will my legs snap if i get into an accident? probably, but whatever.

(should have seen me trying to drive a friends Porsche, now that was a challenge!)
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