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BMW 3-Series and 4-Series Forum (F30 / F32) | F30POST > Technical Forums > N47 and N57 Turbodiesel Engine / Drivetrain / Exhaust Modifications > High Pressure Fuel Pump Replacement
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      07-14-2019, 08:14 AM   #1
kdog_x
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High Pressure Fuel Pump Replacement

For anyone contemplating a DIY replacement of the high pressure fuel pump on the 328d with N47 engine, here is a walkthrough of the steps involved. I may have left some things out, but this should give you a pretty good idea of what's involved. Having done it once, I would say you could complete this in a long day, but I would probably set aside a weekend in case things don't go smoothly.

So, first step is to disconnect your Mass Air Meter



Then, release the flat head screw that holds it to the airbox



Then, disconnect the pipe from the bottom of the airbox by pinching it and move it out of the way



This gives you access to the lower hose connected to the turbo. Remove the 10mm bolt which holds it in place and the electrical connector on the PCV valve, I have a catch can installed so I have some extra hoses and didn't need to disconnect it from the pipe. Stock would have a corrugated tube here which also would need to be disconnected from the manifold.



Then there's a snap clip that holds the pipe to the turbo. It can be removed by prying to the left by hand, or with a small screwdriver.




Then remove the snap clip that holds the pipe to the turbo

This gives you access to the crank pulley / damper. There's a cap that covers the bolts, gently pry that off with a screwdriver to get access.




I Didn't take any pictures of this task but remove all 3 of the plastic covers from the bottom of the car. There's quite a few 8mm bolts down there, a couple 10mm bolts that require a deep well socket, and a couple anti-theft torx head bolts. If you're attempting pump replacement you've probably removed these before for something.

Again, no pictures but after that remove the heavy metal cover that is underneath the engine, which is held in place with 13mm bolts.

Now that all of the covers are out of the way, on the passenger side of the engine, there is a plastic plug that covers the flywheel port, grab that with a needle nose and pull it out.




This is the flywheel locking key. You can see that the tip has a reduced diameter, this slides into a notch in the flywheel which is only accessible when the #1 piston is at TDC (top dead center) on the firing stroke.




This is the tool for turning the crankshaft. It has indents to go over the 4 bolts that mount the crankshaft.



Last edited by kdog_x; 07-14-2019 at 09:00 AM..
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      07-14-2019, 08:15 AM   #2
kdog_x
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Now you need an assistant. Have them turn the crankshaft clockwise (very slowly) while you watch through the little inspection hole. The newtis instructions say not to turn it counter-clockwise, but I'm not sure what the harm is if you pass it up by a little and have to go back. It needs to be very exact, a mm too far with the crank pulley and the key won't fit.

You won't have the proper angle to see directly into the hole, so this is best accomplished laying on your back with a bright light and an inspection mirror. I made a paint mark at 12 o'clock on the crank pulley once I found it. This makes it easy to find again and eliminates the need for an assistant (though it's still easier to do with one)

Here it is with the key locked in place. Once it is locked, go ahead and try to turn the crank pulley either direction. If you can move it, the key is not in place. This step is critical, failure to perform this correctly will cause you to need to remove the engine to reset the timing! So don't move on until it's locked.



Now we're done under the car.

Back up top, remove the torx heads that cover the ECU



Then we've got rubber grommets that hold the wiring into the mounting box, they just pull up and out




Then remove the computer harness. You slide a tab sideways on the two clips and they release very easily. It should come out by hand or with a small screwdriver. Don't pry on these, I'm sure they're not cheap or easy to replace.




Remove the ECU and push the wiring out of the way. Remove the 2 bolts that hold the computer box in place




Remove the 4 bolts from the strut tower brace, it's a large E18 socket. The two bolts by the windshield have little plastic covers you need to pop off.



Once that is removed, remove the screws from the additional plastic cover behind it and get it out of the way




Then remove the acoustic cover, there are 2 plastic clips



Then remove the torx screw that holds the dipstick in place and pull it out. You may notice I had the intake removed for cleaning, so your engine bay will look slightly different.



There's two clamps that hold the supply and return lines to the high pressure pump. Loosen the clamps and pull both hoses free.


Last edited by kdog_x; 07-14-2019 at 09:37 AM..
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      07-14-2019, 08:15 AM   #3
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Then remove the high pressure line.



This tool holds the pump sprocket in place while the pump is removed. It threads into a hole in the back of the engine. There is a 17mm plastic plug that needs to be removed before inserting it.



Here it is, threaded into place. The actual BMW tool for this task is a 2 piece assembly, so your tool may not match but they work similarly. This MUST stay in place while the pump is removed or you will need to pull the engine and reset the timing





Then remove the 4 bolts that hold the bracket to the cylinder head and the pump. Followed by removal of the bracket, it's a tight squeeze, but it can be worked out of there



Remove the electrical connector for the pump




With the bracket out of the way, there are two bolts that hold the pump to the cylinder head, one here and one down below.




Loosen the last bolt holding the pump through the special tool in the back and work the pump forward off of the cylinder head.




And there it is with the pump removed


Last edited by kdog_x; 07-14-2019 at 11:18 AM..
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      07-14-2019, 08:16 AM   #4
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Take note of the clocking of the pump compared to your old one, if they are not oriented the same way, you will need to spin the shaft of the pump until they match. The notch is facing down on the pumps in this picture. You can't install it incorrectly, it will not go into place due to the key way on the shaft. On my new pump, I had to spin it 180 degrees




Installation is basically the reverse of removal. Torque all the critical bolts to spec.

After installation, the system needs to be primed in ISTA+. There may be other programs that will do this task as well. Not sure what would happen if you skip this step, but given that air in the pump is one of the potential causes of failure for this pump I wouldn't chance it.

Last edited by kdog_x; 07-14-2019 at 11:29 AM..
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      07-14-2019, 09:11 AM   #5
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Always wondered what that smaller secondary hose going to the bottom of airbox was. Now that you posted a clear picture of it (pic #3) I have to ask, what is that smaller secondary hose going to the bottom of airbox? Seems redundant.
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      07-14-2019, 11:34 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by opinion914 View Post
Always wondered what that smaller secondary hose going to the bottom of airbox was. Now that you posted a clear picture of it (pic #3) I have to ask, what is that smaller secondary hose going to the bottom of airbox? Seems redundant.
I'm not really sure what the purpose of the second hose is, never really thought about it. Maybe some type of pressure equalization. I haven't pulled the airbox apart in a while, I'd have to look at the internals of the airbox next time I have it apart for a filter change.
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      07-14-2019, 01:03 PM   #7
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Thank you.
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      07-14-2019, 01:30 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by opinion914 View Post
Always wondered what that smaller secondary hose going to the bottom of airbox was. Now that you posted a clear picture of it (pic #3) I have to ask, what is that smaller secondary hose going to the bottom of airbox? Seems redundant.
Quote:
Originally Posted by kdog_x View Post
I'm not really sure what the purpose of the second hose is, never really thought about it. Maybe some type of pressure equalization. I haven't pulled the airbox apart in a while, I'd have to look at the internals of the airbox next time I have it apart for a filter change.
I wonder if it's for more air flow. That extra tube isn't there on gas engine air boxes (everything else is the same ).
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      07-14-2019, 09:35 PM   #9
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This is one of those things that I know is beyond what I would ever feel comfortable doing... yet... itís great this exists.
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      07-15-2019, 04:52 PM   #10
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It probably looks more complicated than it is. Still an advanced DIY, but doable.
I've done it twice on TDI VW, and it's more complicated because there is a timing belt you have to mind. No locking sprocket mechanism.
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      07-15-2019, 11:40 PM   #11
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I just completed replacing mine. Used a cheap smartphone borescope to help find the TDC locking hole. Image below.
Primed for 3 minutes with ISTA ... no start. Primed for another 3 minutes .... no start. Found low rail pressure error code. Primed again and cracked injector line #1 during. Bubbles came out and closed it once it was just fuel coming out. Car started up. Soooooooo relieved.
https://f30.bimmerpost.com/forums/at...1&d=1563251936
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      07-16-2019, 09:18 AM   #12
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Strange you needed to crack the line to get it to start up, you would think 3 minutes would definitely purge any air out, I guess it can still get a trapped pocket somewhere. Glad you got it figured out. I know the panic that sets in when it cranks without starting after the time in on that job. Not a bad picture for a cell phone scope!!
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      08-07-2019, 09:04 AM   #13
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Well, it has been seven tanks of gas since fuel pump replacement. Average MPG has been 41.4. That's up from around 38.5. Not sure if it was the pump or the concurrent intake cleaning, but definitely a measurable improvement!
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      08-08-2019, 06:04 PM   #14
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Is this the future for BMW diesel owners....
https://www.thedrive.com/news/29331/...merican-diesel
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      08-08-2019, 07:30 PM   #15
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More like the quality of diesel is the problem in the US. That and water/condensation contamination. I won't get into debate whether Bosch should have built a pump that can tolerate crap diesel, but it is the fuel that is the cause. The CP4 is perfectly fine, especially the updated ones.


There have been massive updates to the BMW HPFP due to this. I now have 2 pumps with varying degrees of updates inside, and they have been very much strengthened to not only take a bit of lower quality fuel, but also prevent system wide contamination in case of failure.

I may make a thread that documents the updates with pictures, but I already have the manufacturer specs and revision updates. It's just nice to see it in person.
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      08-09-2019, 05:37 PM   #16
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My 'old version' pump made it to 120k. Could be that midwest diesel is decent quality, not sure... I do fill up in IL / IN / IA / WI / MI /MO so definitely not one station in particular. I'm just happy it didn't blow up.

You saw the internals, looked pretty good. I have faith the new one will likely outlive the car. Seems likely the trans / transfer case / timing belt (or other engine issue) would be the most likely issues by 250k
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      08-10-2019, 08:24 AM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Enabled View Post
More like the quality of diesel is the problem in the US. That and water/condensation contamination. I won't get into debate whether Bosch should have built a pump that can tolerate crap diesel, but it is the fuel that is the cause. The CP4 is perfectly fine, especially the updated ones.
GM did give up on the Bosch unit regardless. Denso is the new supplier and I haven't read about any similar problems yet.
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      08-11-2019, 10:33 AM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kdog_x View Post
My 'old version' pump made it to 120k. Could be that midwest diesel is decent quality, not sure... I do fill up in IL / IN / IA / WI / MI /MO so definitely not one station in particular. I'm just happy it didn't blow up.

You saw the internals, looked pretty good. I have faith the new one will likely outlive the car. Seems likely the trans / transfer case / timing belt (or other engine issue) would be the most likely issues by 250k
I agree with this. It isn't that bad of an issue, with the exception of one bad tank of fuel. There is a user here that it happened to on a trip through the southwest, after going to an unknown station. That is sad.
There's nothing wrong with replacing with the older version, I hope I didn't carry across as that way. The knowledge gained from all of this is very important.




Regarding GM, props to them for finding an easy alternative. I wonder if they also added a water separator in their fuel lines? I have seen these in the Dodge trucks.

In the VW world, there are many talks about changing to a CP3 pump, but this would very much be a downgrade for performance and when considering costs. They try to spin it as an upgrade, but it just isn't that.
I kind of wonder if Bosch and VW have brought the updated pumps to VW? The BMW pump would fit.

In fact, for the truck world that use the CP4.2, dual head pump, it would be really simple to update their older CP4.2 to the updated BMW CP4.2 from the 535d.

Anyways, I ramble.
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      08-11-2019, 11:35 AM   #19
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The Duramax has a fuel water separator that has a water sensor and drain on the bottom of the filter. It's been like that for quite a while, predating the CP4 pump. You have to swap the sensor from old to new when changing the filter so you get a peak inside the filter. If you have water problems you'll find rust on the inside bottom of the filter. I guess the question is are they effective enough.
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      08-11-2019, 01:33 PM   #20
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Looks like there is a lawsuit against GM about the pump:

https://www.autoblog.com/2019/08/09/...diesel-trucks/
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